Saturday, July 18, 2015

Radiation

Yesterday, I posted an activity on Marie Curie.  In the google plus group, one of the folks posted a video on the most radioactive places on earth.  The video includes information on Madame Curie's home but it also includes some places I would never have guessed were even radioactive.  Watching the video lead me to see there is another real life math lesson.
Beakers, Experiment, Flasks, Research1.  Students watch the video.
2.  Students re-watch the video and fill out a data sheet on the material covered in the video.
3.  Students use a spread sheet to put in data to create bar graphs, pi charts, etc.
4.  Students write up a conclusion to go with the graphs.

Idea 2.
1.  Students watch the video and fill out a data sheet.
2.  Students go on the internet to do research on the narrator's claims.
3.  Check to see if the claims of radiation output match commonly accepted radiation outputs.
4.  On a spreadsheet, input the data and create two sets of spread sheets to compare the claims in the video with the ones found by the student.
5.  Students write up a conclusion on how correct the claims are.
Extention.
Students research the rates for human exposure per year and figure out how much of each item the person needs to be exposed to before they reach the legal limit in the United States.